Summary of Policies

1. Blood Rule and Body Fluids Policy
An athlete who suffers a bleeding wound (old or new) during training / competing / grading must without delay, advise the instructor and then leave the dojo mat immediately to seek medical attention. If there is blood on the Gi, Mitts, Shin / Instep and/or any other protective equipment the athlete must change the bloodied item immediately. For blood spilt on the mat/surrounding area, that area must be wiped thoroughly with bleach and a detergent solution and dried, leaving no trace or stain of blood.

2. Infectious Diseases Policy
An athlete with open cuts/abrasions must report this to the Instructor prior to entry on the mat. These infections spread by direct contact onto broken skin/mucous membranes. All open cuts/abrasions must be covered before entering onto the mat. An athlete with prior evidence of an infectious disease (eg Viral Hepatitis / HIV AIDS) is to obtain doctor’s clearance prior to training / competing / grading.

3. The Pregnant Athlete Policy
The pregnant athlete must obtain a medical clearance before resuming training (with a copy of that clearance provided to her instructor). It is the responsibility of the athlete to ensure that she is not involved in activity that puts her at risk of being injured or harmed in any way. Where possible, the instructor is to work with the athlete to ensure that she can continue her involvement in her training / competition / grading.

4. Anti-Discrimination and Harassment Policy
Discrimination (direct, indirect, harassment, victimisation and vilification) will not be tolerated. Where an athlete feels that he/she is subjected to this form of treatment they should bring it to the attention of their Instructor. This Instructor will manage the complaint in accordance with the Kimekai Discrimination Policy.

1. Blood Rule and Body Fluids Policy

The aim of this policy is to decrease the exposure risk to blood-borne and body fluid pathogens (1) whilst at training/competing/grading at events organised by Kimekai Karate.

Instructors, officials, and athletes associated with the Kimekai Karate, are responsible for understanding and implementing and follow this policy.

The following guidelines must be implemented at the dojo/competition/grading area:

  • When the instructor is advised or witnesses an athlete with a bleed, the instructor will direct that athlete to leave the dojo mat immediately, if not already done, to seek medical attention.
  • The athlete’s injury/wound must be treated (no further bleeding) with the affected area completely and securely covered and only return to the mat on advice from the treating qualified instructor.
  • The treating qualified instructor must record the first aid treatment given in a record book or complete an incident form.
  • If there is any blood on the Gi, or protective equipment the competitor must change the blooded item immediately. (It is the responsibility of the athlete to ensure they have a replacement Gi and protective equipment.) Under no circumstances should an athlete be allowed on the mat with wet or dry blood stains on their Gi or any protective equipment.
  • Blood or body fluids spilt on the mat or immediate surrounding area must be treated with a bleach and detergent solution (2) as outlined in procedures given as Attachment A: Attending to Blood or Body Fluids on Mat or Immediate Area.
  • A ‘Blood Kit’ is provided at each dojo reception and for competitions/grading, at the officials table. The Blood Kit should be used only for the purpose of dealing with spilt blood and or body fluid on the mat and or immediate surrounding area. The contents are listed in Attachment B: Blood Kit.

ATTACHMENT A: ATTENDING TO BLOOD OR BODY FLUIDS ON MAT OR IMMEDIATE AREA.
Persons (including Instructors and Officials) attending to blood or body fluids on the mat and or immediate area, must

  • Take precautions so as not to come into contact with blood or body fluids, wet or dry, either on themselves, their clothing or protective equipment. In particular avoid blood or body fluids reaching the eyes or the areas inside the mouth and nose.
  • Must designate 1 person(or people if large spill) to clean the soiled area. In doing so that designated person/s must:
    • wear single-use disposable gloves (3);
    • use the ‘Spray’ setting, and being beware of any splash, spray the bleach and detergent solution directly onto the soiled surface, and let soak for 5 minutes;
    • After 5 minutes, wipe the surface with paper towel; and
    • place all soiled paper towel and gloves in a sealed disposable bag to disposed in an approved manner.
  • Protective equipment, being the property of the athlete, must be placed in a sealed plastic bag which is returned to the athlete who has the responsibility to wash the items in a normal machine-washing process.
  • Immediately after every clean up of blood or body fluid, hands including arms to the elbow must be washed with warm water and soap for 1 minute. This should be performed even if gloves have been worn. Wash all areas that have come into contact with blood.
  • Under NO circumstances use any material other than paper towel to clean blood or body fluid.

 

ATTACHMENT B: BLOOD KIT
A ‘Blood Kit’ is provided at each dojo reception and for competitions/grading, at the officials table. The Blood Kit should be used only for the purpose of dealing with spilt blood and or body fluid on the mat and or immediate surrounding area.

A Blood Kit contents include:

  • 3 Packets of paper hand towel;
  • 2 packets of single use disposable gloves (recommended size medium + large);
  • 2 Packets of medium sized plastic bags, with a re-sealable top; and
  • 1 x 1000 ml Spray Bottle with solution made up as outlined below

Solution for Spray Bottle

Make up solution in the spray bottle as follows:

  • 0.5mL of bleach, preferably hospital grade
  • 2mL of detergent; and
  • 97.5mL of water.

The date of preparation should be written on the bottle and should be prepared on the day

All personnel involved with training/competition/grading must be aware of these guidelines; in particular of ‘point 4 Attachment A’

BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON THE PREVENTION OF HIV AND VIRAL HEPATITIS
(Taken from a circular from Dr. Jacques Huguet, President of FIBA Medical Council)

  • Some sports carry a greater risk of contamination than others in so far as there is a greater possibility of blood contact.
  • Contact can occur through open and bleeding wounds as well as through abrasive or inflammatory injuries to the skin.
  • In the field of sports one should know that the AIDS virus cannot be transmitted by saliva, sweat, urine, skin contact, handshakes, bath water, swimming pools, showers or toilets.
  • Light washing with detergent or water does not necessarily kill the HIV.
  • HIV can survive in dried blood for up to seven days.
  • The risk of blood on clothing being transmitted to another player is extremely small, but real.

ABOUT THIS POLICY
This policy was endorsed on the 11 August 2006. It will be reviewed annually and updated accordingly.

(1) A pathogen is any agent that can cause disease
(2) 0.5% bleach and 2% detergent mixed with water and applied for five minutes as outlined in Attachment B
(3) Latex can cause skin irritation

 

2. Infectious Diseases Policy

The aim of this policy is to decrease the risk of exposure to infectious disease whilst at training/competition/grading at events organised by Kimekai Karate.

A number of blood-borne infectious diseases can be transmitted during body contact1and collision sports. The more serious include Viral Hepatitis and HIV (AIDS) infection.

It is important to remember that the more common diseases, such as the “common cold”, flu and herpes simplex may be spread during body contact sports.

It is strongly recommended that the following people be informed of this policy and adopt its recommendations:

  • instructors and officials;
  • administrators; and
  • athletes and their parents.

BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON THE PREVENTION OF VIRAL HEPATITIS AND HIV (AIDS):

(Taken from a circular from Dr. Jacques Huguet, President of FIBA Medical Council)

  • Some sports carry a greater risk of contamination than others in so far as there is a greater possibility of blood contact.
  • Contact can occur through open and bleeding wounds as well as through abrasive or inflammatory injuries to the skin.
  • In the field of sports one should know that the AIDS virus cannot be transmitted by saliva, sweat, urine, skin contact, handshakes, bath water, swimming pools, showers or toilets.
  • Light washing with detergent or water does not necessarily kill the HIV.
  • HIV can survive in dried blood for up to seven days.
  • The risk of blood on clothing being transmitted to another player is extremely small, but real.

MINIMISING THE RISK OF VIRAL HEPATITIS AND HIV (AIDS) INFECTIONS

Transmitted diseases like Viral Hepatitis (eg B and C) and HIV (AIDS) may be extremely debilitating and potentially disastrous for the athletes, the team, and associated personnel. These infections may be spread by direct contact with infected blood and other body fluids onto broken skin or mucous membranes.

All open cuts and abrasions must be reported and treated immediately.

INSTRUCTORS

  • Instructors must report all open cuts and abrasions immediately for first aid attention.
  • It is recommended that those who officiate in Karate competitions should consider being vaccinated against Hepatitis B.
  • All contaminated Gi and protective equipment must be replaced prior to the athlete being allowed to resume.
  • If bleeding cannot be controlled and the wound securely covered, the athlete must not continue.
  • However, If bleeding should recur, the above procedures must be repeated.

ATHLETES

  • It is every athlete’s responsibility to maintain strict personal hygiene at all times, in all activities on and off the mat.
  • It is recommended that all athletes involved in Karate, and playing under adult rules consider being vaccinated against Hepatitis B.
  • All participants with prior evidence of these infections are strongly advised to obtain confidential advice and clearance from a doctor prior to training/competition/grading.

DOJO’S

  • It is the responsibility of the Senior Instructor on duty to ensure that the change rooms (including female/male amenities) are clean and tidy. Particular attention should be paid to hand-basins and toilets. Adequate soap, paper hand towels, brooms, waste disposal bins and disinfectants must be available at all times.
  • The practice of spitting must NOT be permitted.
  • All Gi, protective equipment or any other equipment and surfaces contaminated by blood must be treated as potentially infectious. Such items must be removed and placed in an appropriate container specific for this purpose which is the responsibility of the athlete.
  • Contaminated equipment and surfaces must be cleaned immediately as outlined in Blood Rule and Body Fluids Policy (Attachment A), also attached to this policy.

ABOUT THIS POLICY

This policy was endorsed on the 11 August 2007. It will be reviewed annually and updated accordingly.

3. The Pregnant Athlete Policy

The aim of this policy is to reduce the risk of injury to the pregnant athlete whilst at training/competing/grading at events organised by Kimekai Karate.

The main risks to the pregnant athlete are:

  • direct trauma to the abdomen;
  • joint back injury due to increased ligament laxity;
  • overheating; and
  • dehydration.

This policy encompasses:

  • support and guidance to the pregnant athlete; and
  • direction for Kimekai Instructors in assisting the pregnant athlete.

Instructors, officials, and athletes associated with the Kimekai Karate, are responsible for understanding, implementing and following this policy.

THE FOLLOWING GUIDELINES MUST BE IMPLEMENTED AT THE DOJO/COMPETITION/GRADING AREA:
The pregnant athlete must:

  • obtain expert medical advice, and obtain a clear understanding of the risks, particularly in regard with your involvement in karate,
  • before making the decision about whether to continue to participate;
  • obtain medical certificate from your doctor stating that “you are able to continue in the sport”;
  • advise your Instructors of your pregnancy;
  • regularly review the training program with your medical adviser; and
  • consider your insurance cover to ensure that it is adequate and relevant;

Should the pregnant athlete decide to continue in the sport she must at all times:

  • use common sense and do not take unnecessary risks;
  • take into account her changes in physical condition;
  • not to increase the intensity of training;
  • always work at less than 75 per cent of your maximum heart rate; and
  • watch for warning signs, such as bleeding or abdominal pain, and see a doctor immediately if these occur.

The Instructor must:

  • support the pregnant athlete who has decided to continue;
  • sight the medical certificate from her doctor stating “that she is able to continue in the sport”;
  • advise all other assisting Instructors for that session;
  • modify the program where necessary to:
  • avoid unnecessary risks;
  • take into account the changes in her physical condition;
  • have her work at less than 75 per cent of maximum heart rate; and
  • allow more frequent drinks during class.

Should the Instructor become concerned about the athletes’ well-being, the Instructor must raise this concern with the athlete with the view as to whether participation continues.

The Instructor must avoid giving advice where not qualified to give.

4. Anti-Discrimination and Harassment Policy

The aim of this policy is to prevent discrimination and harassment whilst at training/competing/grading at events organised by Kimekai Karate.

Instructors, officials, and athletes associated with Kimekai Karate, are responsible for understanding, implementing and following this policy.

Where an athlete feels discriminated against or harassed, for what ever reason, they must immediately bring this to the attention of the senior instructor. Should the individual (athlete/parent/instructor) not be satisfied with the way the matter is managed at this level or the outcome, the matter must be raised immediately with the Chief Instructor.

It is also against the discrimination law to victimise a person who is involved in making a complaint of discrimination or harassment.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Direct discrimination means treating or proposing to treat someone less favourably than someone else because of a particular characteristic.

Indirect Discrimination means imposing or intending to impose an unreasonable requirement, condition or practice that is the same for everyone, but which has an unequal or disproportionate effect on the individual or group of people.

The characteristics covered by discrimination law across Australia include:

  • Age;
  • Disability;
  • Family/carer responsibilities;
  • Gender identity/transgender status;
  • Homosexuality and sexual orientation;
  • Irrelevant medical record;
  • Irrelevant criminal record;
  • Favouritism;
  • Political belief/activity;
  • Pregnancy and breastfeeding;
  • Race;
  • Religious belief/activity;
  • Sex or gender;
  • Social origin; and
  • Education.

Some States and Territories include additional characteristics such as physical features or association with a person with one or more of the characteristics listed above.

EXAMPLES OF DISCRIMINATION
Age: The club refuses to allow an older person to teach simply because of age.

Breastfeeding: A mother breastfeeding her baby at the club is asked to leave.

Disability: A junior athlete is overlooked because of mild epilepsy.

Family responsibilities: The club decides not to promote an employee because he has a child with a disability even though the employee is the best person for the job.

Favouritism: where an athlete is allowed to do additional classes when this has not offered to all athletes.

Homosexuality: An athlete is ostracised from the club after telling fellow athletes that she is a lesbian/he is gay.

Marital Status: An athlete is deliberately excluded from activities and social functions because of being single.

Pregnancy: A woman is dropped from her squad when becoming pregnant.

Sex: Specialist coaching is only offered to male players in a mixed team.

Harassment is any type of behaviour that the other person does not want and that is offensive, abusive, bullying, belittling or threatening. The behaviour is unwelcome and of a type that a reasonable person would recognise as being unwelcome and likely to cause the recipient to feel offended, humiliated or intimidated. Harassment may be a single incident or repeated; it may be explicit or implicit, verbal or non-verbal.

Intended or unintended harassment is irrelevant as the focus is on the impact of the behaviour.

Unlawful harassment includes the above but is either sexual or targets a person because of their race, sex, pregnancy, marital status, sexual orientation or other characteristic (see characteristic list under discrimination).

The basic rule is if someone else finds it harassing then it could be considered harassment.

Some exceptions to State and Federal anti-discrimination laws apply. Examples include:

  • holding a competitive sporting activity for females only who are 12 years of age or over where strength, stamina or physique is relevant; and
  • not selecting a participant if the person’s disability means he or she is not reasonably capable of performing the actions reasonably required for that sporting activity.

Requesting, assisting, instructing, inducing or encouraging another person to engage in discrimination or harassment may also be against the law.

It is also against discrimination law to victimise a person who is involved in making a complaint of discrimination or harassment. Example: a player is ostracised by her male coach for complaining about his sexist behaviour to another club official or for supporting another player who has made such a complaint.

Public acts of racial hatred which are reasonably likely to offend, insult, humiliate or intimidate are also prohibited. This applies to spectators, participants or any other person who engages in such an act in public. A player is ostracised by her coach for complaining about his racist behaviour to another club official.