Road to the WKF World Championships:

Interview with U21 Australian Rep & Kimekai Competitor, Hamish Jobling

Kimekai cultivates talent like no other. First, honing in on a karateka’s inner passion and strength. Then channeling their determination into a guided practice. Finally, providing avenues to let them show the world how far they’ve come.

While we reckon that our instructors have a knack of bringing our students’ inner talents, our Kimekai karatekas always manage to push their boundaries and take their kata and kumite skills to new heights. Later this October, our students will be competing in the WKF World Cadet Junior and Under 21 Championship in Santiago, Chile. 

Hamish Jobling, is one of these young competitors representing Kimekai, and Australia. Hamish has been with Kimekai since he was 6 years old. We asked the 16-year old 2nd Dan black belt what it means to represent his country in a world wide conference of karate and how he began learning karate. 
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Question: Hamish, tell us about why and how you started studying karate.

Hamish: I started studying karate by accident, my parents were driving home and as we passed the dojo. I just happened to look out the window and said to my parents that I would like to try karate one day. From the very first moment I stepped on the mat, I loved it. After the initial trial period was up my parents ask me if I wanted to leave or sign up, I replied I wanted to keep going and to sign me up. I don’t remember my first lesson, but I do remember being a little bit nervous. The class was taught by Sensei Luke who had a great teaching style and likeable personality.

Question: Tell us a little bit about the people that have that have they helped you on your Karate journey. What was your first tournament like? Who was your opponent?  

Hamish: I do not know who I would call my main teacher, everyone at Kimekai have been amazing. I am grateful to my coach Marco Mazzanti, Sensei Luke, Sensei John, Sensei Emily and many others associated with this great club that have helped me along the way.

I don’t remember my first tournament, however I do remember being chosen for the first time to represent Victoria at the Nationals in Hobart Tasmania, and winning the National title at just 11 years of age. I prepared not only physically, doing the normal things but also mentally, I believe the most important asset of an athlete is the mind. An athlete must always be smart. My opponent in the final was Jackson Hinds from Queensland, I won the final 4-1. Afterwards I felt relief and joy, it was a special moment.

Question: How does it feel representing Australia at the WKF championship? What does your prep look like?

Hamish: Clearly, the privilege of having the badge of the national team on my karate gi is not the result of an easy path. For this reason, I feel extremely proud every time I get selected to represent my country. Seeing how this year went, with all the success I have had so far, I am continuing to train the physical part,I still have a few tricks that I want to try and I want to keep improving, however I am also spending a lot of time working on my mental preparation for the World Championships. I have to be ready to deal with is the pressure and to make the most of my participation in this competition.

Hamish: Clearly, the privilege of having the badge of the national team on my karate gi is not the result of an easy path. For this reason, I feel extremely proud every time I get selected to represent my country. Seeing how this year went, with all the success I have had so far, I am continuing to train the physical part,I still have a few tricks that I want to try and I want to keep improving, however I am also spending a lot of time working on my mental preparation for the World Championships. I have to be ready to deal with is the pressure and to make the most of my participation in this competition.

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The road to becoming a good at karate isn’t easy. However, as Hamish would say to any budding karateka, “If you love something enough, you will always find a way to do it.”

If you think you’ve got what it takes to represent Australia in Karate Championships and beyond, head over to http://kimekai.com.au/contact-us/ and we would love to be a part of your story.